The EgyptAir Flight: Moment by Moment

EgyptAir Flight 804, on the way from Paris to Cairo, vanished from radar over the Mediterranean Sea on Thursday morning after it unexpectedly turned and dropped in height, authorities said.

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11:09 p.m.
Departed from Paris Charles De Gaulle airport.

2:26 a.m.
Pilot speaks with Greece traffic controllers.

2:30 a.m.
Last radar contact with EgyptAir.

2:37 a.m.
Enters Egyptian airspace.

The flight withdrew Paris on Wednesday night. At 2:26 a.m., without further ado before it was required to arrive in Cairo, the pilot addressed air movement controllers in Greece and nothing appeared to be strange, authorities said. Three or after four minutes, the plane reached.

In the wake of entering Egyptian airspace at 2:37 a.m., the plane made a 90-degree swing to one side and after that a 360-degree swing to one side, diving to 15,000 feet from 37,000 feet and vanishing from radar, the Greek barrier clergyman, Panos Kammenos, said at a news gathering Thursday evening.


Plane Turned Erratically and Plunged
to 15,000 Feet Before Disappearing


The cause is not yet known, but rather the Egyptian clergyman for common flying, Sherif Fathy, said on Thursday that the probability the accident was an aftereffect of terrorism was "higher" than it was for a specialized disappointment or some likeness thereof. 

Aeronautics wellbeing specialists said that such sudden developments were profoundly bizarre at any period of flight and recommended some sort of in-flight crisis. 

The powers mounted an extreme pursuit and-salvage operation centered around the Greek island of Karpathos, amongst Crete and Rhodes. 

Prior in the day, the Greek powers said that searchers discovered bits of the destruction of the plane in Egyptian regional waters. It was later affirmed that the flotsam and jetsam found in the water was not from the plane.

Where the Plane Flew in the Day Before the Crash

As investigators scramble to piece together clues to what happened to EgyptAir Flight 804, analysts said that some attention would probably be focused on where the plane flew in the 24 hours before the crash, with stops in countries where aviation security standards have previously raised concerns.

1 Cairo–Asmara–Cairo
On Tuesday night, the plane flew to Asmara, the capital of Eritrea. At 4:30 a.m. Wednesday, the plane returned to Cairo and stayed for two hours.

2 Cairo–Tunis–Cairo
At 8:21 a.m., the plane left for Tunis, the capital of Tunisia. After about an hour, it returned to Cairo, arriving at 3:17 p.m.

3 Cairo–Paris–Cairo
The Cairo stopover was less than two hours. The plane left for Paris, landing at 9:55 p.m. It left for Cairo shortly after 11 p.m. Wednesday before it crashed.

A consultative distributed by the United States State Department in May 2015 cautioned that security at Asmara International Airport "can be eccentric," and noticed an "absence of productivity and consistency" in the screening of explorers there. 

In the wake of the October shelling of a Russian carrier over the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt, European authorities communicated worries about crevices in airplane terminal security at air terminals in North Africa, including Tunisia, and in addition at a few air terminals in Egypt. 

The plane, an Airbus A320, was conveyed to EgyptAir in November 2003 and had amassed 48,000 hours of flying time. The Airbus A320 can regularly suit up to 220 travelers and is normally worked to last 30 or 40 years.
Source: New York Times

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